Relationship Goals: A Millennial’s View

It is probably the millennial in me that is hesitant to speak for the collective but I’ll give it a shot. If we are working with you we want to be there, we want to learn from you, we want to grow in this experience. We also want to be respected and listened to but I promise we want to be there and we want to do the work.

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Tina Schweiger
A Nova Guide to Executive Presence: Thoughtfulness

It’s almost impossible to build a connection with someone else if you aren’t really listening to what they have to say. Active listening, when you are engaged and attentive, is the number one thing you can do to build relationships and improve your personal and work life. When you really hear what the other person is saying, you can think through and give yourself time to respond.

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Tina Schweiger
Drawing Inspiration From Austin

Some days I step into my office raring to go.  The engines are firing on all cylinders, the coffee is roaring through my veins, the creative juices are flowing, and I take a red pen to my to do list. And then other days, my baby is up all night, the line is too long at my coffee place, and the fog in my brain leads me to inertia in my desk chair.

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A Nova Guide to Executive Presence: Warmth

One of the biggest barriers facing women leaders today is a perceived lack of “executive presence.” This phrase is often used – and often misunderstood, even by the people using it! Intelligent, capable and talented women are being held back in their careers because they don’t meet an ambiguous standard for what an executive should look like.

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Tina Schweiger
A Nova Guide To Executive Presence: Self Confidence

Change your self-talk. I can say with 100% certainty that you are your own worst critic, bar none. Yes, it’s good to have high standards and yes, you should keep reaching for the stars, just not at the expense of your own ego! Instead of identifying the ten things that went wrong in a meeting or a conversation, train your mind to recognize what went right.

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Tina Schweiger